Tubular Breast Correction

Tubular Breast Correction

Tubular breasts are the result of a congenital deformity that can appear in both genders during puberty and can contribute to anxiety and embarrassment.  It occurs when one or both breasts fail to fully expand, leading to asymmetrical or misshapen anatomy. Breasts may appear constricted at the base with enlarged nipples. There are different severities of this condition, but all types can be surgically corrected.

Who is it for?

Patients with tubular breasts who are generally healthy.

What is treatment like?

This surgery is performed in an outpatient surgical facility under general anesthesia. Your surgeon will make the appropriate incisions based on the exact shape and density of your breast tissue.  Your surgeon will release the constricted tissue at the base of your breasts, allowing it to spread and relax into a fuller, more natural shape. If you want bigger breasts or your breasts are different sizes, you’ll need implants.  A silicone or saline implant will be inserted under or over your muscle.

Following surgery, you’ll need a week to recover before resuming normal activities.

What are the risks?

A tubular breast correction may result in temporary or permanent changes in sensation. All surgeries carry risks for medical complications, which your surgeon will discuss the risks you. Don’t take aspirin, Advil, fish oil, or other blood thinners for two weeks before and after surgery, to avoid hematomas and excessive bleeding.

What are the results?

In about three months, your breasts will have settled into their final, more balanced and attractive positioning.

Preview the Potential New You Today

A 3D Vectra Imaging consultation allows you to preview a photo realistic new you. Available at The Mid Florida Institute of Plastic Surgery in Altamonte Springs. Consultation fee applies.

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